Meet the Candidates – Port Waikato Electorate

The following is a transcript of the meeting that was held on 30th September in Clarks Beach to meet the candidates who are standing in the Port Waikato Electorate in the General Election on 17th October

Dave King – Act
Act’s policies are and what we are looking to do in the next parliament
1 Getting Kiwis back to work – that’s a major
2 Balancing the books – obviously, we are in a lot of debt.
3 Cutting red tape
4 Building for the future
5 Protecting public health – with Covid around it is something on everyone’s minds.
We think this election is going to come down to having a real roadmap to recovery. That will help us to rebuild the economy. People are hurting – jobs are gone, and we haven’t seen the worst of this yet. Having a forward plan is really what we are about. We need to work together to get out of this mess. Act has looked at how we can make it happen and how we can fund it. A lot of people are asking ‘where is the money coming from?’ We have looked at several policies, we are looking at an immediate reduction in gst for 12 months from 15 to 10 percent. That helps everybody and injects money into the economy. With that we have looked at the tax system and what we want to do is simplify it down to three levels. The medium level is what we want to clip the most – from 40k up to 70k. We want to cut that in half to 17.5 percent. From 70k up stays the same at 33 percent. From 0-40 we are looking at 10.5 percent. Part of how we fund it is by gst and tax cuts and the other half is from government spending. There is some really wasteful government spending going on at the moment. It is unbelievable what people are getting grants for and there is so much we can do to improve that. Part of what David’s idea is, is to look at cutting MPs salaries as well. He has done it himself by 20% and he says why not everybody. The Act party is not about the money or the prestige. We are not interested in ministerial positions. The word has been given to us ‘what we want you to do is sit on select committees, make good laws, be effective’ and that’s a lot easier to do when you are at that level, rather than higher up in government. We are grassroots people. We are working people like you guys. We’ve all got day jobs and we are going through the same things as you are at the moment. We have costed all this out and we have come up with an alternative budget available on our website. If you haven’t done the sums and you haven’t got the money you are going nowhere.
 
Jamie Macgregor – Advance NZ
I am a man of few words. I am a father and a stepfather. I have a desire to fix our future. Politics should be an alignment of values. It was apparent to me over a decade ago that our way of life was under attack. The progression now is staggering. Labour and National are both in bed with the Chinese communist party as we have seen from donation scandals. The Greens are no longer green – they are just another shade of red. At Advance NZ we stand for freedom, sovereignty, independence, transparency, and accountability. This is why we are seen as a threat to the establishment. Advance NZ started as a people’s movement and has become the fastest growing political party in this country’s history. Under the guise of Covid we have experienced firsthand our rights being taken away without consultation. In the first nine days of lockdown were deemed unlawful. We want freedom to reclaim our Kiwi way of life once again. That’s our right. Sovereignty – that’s our natural right to live life as one chooses without Government’s overreach into our lives. Independence – to have Aotearoa govern itself without interference. Transparency – to uncover what current and successive governments have signed us up for without our knowledge. Uncover conflicts of interest to govern openly by the people who put us in parliament. Accountability – we want to investigate and hold to account those that have not put the best interests of our country first and missed resources at the forefront of decision making. We want for Kiwis what no other government has offered. We want a fundamental shift in democracy – a mechanism to bring the people’s voices to parliament with recognised and frequent referendums. To recognise democratic principles and have our candidates sign legally binding intention and integrity charters as an additional layer of trust. Our firearms policy is coming out this week. We want to legalise firearms licences so that collectors can once again own collectible guns without persecution or undue prosecution. We will work to improve better standards and ethics of the law. We will create a national firearms committee to help implement government policy. We have just released our agriculture policy – we want to remove the Emissions Trading Scheme (EMS), the Paris Accord and other agreements that only stand to cost us for situations such as mono copying, excessive pine forestry. We will remove other red tape. We will customise how each region is handled with the input of locals. We will set up an independent people’s commission to investigate abuse against our people, land, and economy. 1090 use, fluoridation and vaccines will all be investigated outside of the corporate structures that benefit financially from their use. We will rewrite the Government constitution, write a people’s constitution, write a real bill of rights, for the benefit of all people in Aotearoa. We want sovereignty over our bodies, land. Flora and fauna. We will remove outside influences in governments such as foreign donations, the Chinese Communist party, the United Nations, World Health Organisation, UNESCO. We want to open the Government books and see where the money is coming from and is going to. What agreements are in place and do they really benefit NZers. Where poor, negligent, or malicious evidence has been shown we want to see heads roll – no more meaningless apologies. NZ is not for sale and our so-called democracy needs a massive overhaul. Why should the votes of 120 politicians count for any more than yours? That only results in people being overruled in a referendum such as the Auckland Super City debacle and the anti-smacking law. Return freedom to all Kiwis. Remove the Covid 19 Response bill which is basically a framework for turn. We want to end the ability to kick in your door if we suspect someone inside is infected. We want to take a risk based approached to Covid where we will protect the vulnerable if they choose and allow the rest of us to continue our lives and rebuild the economy. We want to put an end to the rolling lockdowns and the impossible strategy which is now being rejected by many experts and institutions. WHO and CDC have revised their numbers to the same range as a bad flu – and that is without a vaccine? However, the Labour Government still seems to be stuck on a flawed model. To kick start the economy, we want to forgive all student debt up to June 2021; we want to remove GST from non-processed foods, baby foods, feminine hygiene products, nappies, medicines and health supplements; we want dentistry for all covered by the healthcare system; we want to decriminalise cannabis; we want no income tax on the first $35,000 of income; we want to end foreign theft. No foreign nation should be able to ship away our most precious resources. We should be adding value here in NZ. We want to abolish Oranga Tamariki and establish a whanau-based approach, providing education and support to give families a hand up in life. Woven throughout our policies we will utilise an all-encompassing model for everyone. We are for empowering and uplifting everyone and treating the precious land we live on with respect.
 
Mark Ball – Heartland
I’m a local. Born and bred in Patumahoe on a dairy farm, educated locally and joined the police – did 18 years locally. Catherine and I started our own business and in 2004. I was elected as the mayor of Franklin district which ended when we joined the Super City. Since then I have been involved in a couple of other ventures. Why Heartland NZ. We have been over several years, been getting more despondent across our electorate and our voice is not being heard. Our communities have been growing exponentially and with that we require the support of local and central government in order for us to have the infrastructure that is required, and other services. But it’s not happening. In 2008 I presented our district’s growth strategy. We knew where we were going to be parking everybody across our district, where we would be growing. I presented it to the government of the day in 2008 and was assured that because we had done it with consideration of our community, that electrification was coming – and still we wait. I was assured that SH22 given the growth, would be fixed up, double laned out to Drury – and still we wait. I was assured because we were on the corner of the golden triangle of Bay of Plenty, Waikato, and Auckland, that we would get a state highway started. SH1 was carried on. I was assured in 2008 that SH2 would be improved but we are still waiting. The answer to all of this has simply been to lower speed limits. We have always known that we would be requiring water for basics of life. The Super City arrived, and we now have water restrictions. So, it has dragged so many of us out of our little cocoons to say “ENOUGH.” We have had enough of the rhetoric of the promises of all of that from successive governments. Our economy of Port Waikato is the exact economy of NZ. We have sheep and beef, we have dairying, we have the underglass, we have kiwifruit, the equine cluster, we’ve got NZ Steel.  We have everything that the economy of NZ has but a whole lot of us are absolutely on the brink because of the stuff that gets thrown from politicians and bureaucrats in Wellington at 100 miles an hour! We also know that our economy will be the recovery of NZ post Covid. I love the fact that the parties are now coming out and getting another round of ‘I promise, I promise, I promise’. We haven’t got [electrification] to Puke but there’s a promise from one of the parties to take it to Pokeno. What Heartland is wanting to do is actually hold some people accountable. I, as many of you know, am about getting things done.  We have a rural fire service up here in Waiau Pa and the ratepayers pay for it. It is fundamentally wrong. The big red truck turns up and a ratepayer pays for it. They are underfunded, under resourced, under trained. Personally, I set about (with Internal Affairs) looking at the fundamental flaw in the process – the Fire Safety Act, and the Fire Services Act. We have now got an amalgamation of that – the Fire Emergency Services. So, our boys up here are now as equipped as Pitt Street. It’s absolutely fantastic. It is not about giving anyone a hospital pass – it’s about doing things pragmatically. It’s about doing what needs to be done. We have always been a nation of No 8 wire. There is absolutely nothing wrong with bringing all of that stuff back. Government doesn’t actually know best. It’s best done at a local level. I sit on several boards. One of them is Te Whare [Tapa Whã]. It’s about getting people off the breadline, off the unemployment and turning them into work ready people post Covid. We are about the people.
 
Ian Cummings – Independent
There are two votes – one for the party and one for the electorate or local candidate. I am asking for the local candidate. MMP was introduced in 1993 to replace First Past the Post. The idea of MMP was so that we have greater representation in Parliament and spread. A lot of votes went to National and Labour and there have been thousands of votes for other parties … and they all got pretty much wasted. The idea was to spread the representation. I won’t talk about the 5 percent threshold – that’s another story. What concerns me most as an independent candidate is that National and Labour and their spin-doctors want us to go two ticks. I think that is almost scurrilous. To me that’s so against the spirit of MMP. I can understand why they are doing it, but it is so wrong. Here in this electorate, Andrew [Bayly] has made his way up to 16 on the list and I congratulate him as that is no easy feat.  I got to No 9 on a particular party’s list and that took decades. It is not easy! To stay there is harder. Don’t feel sorry for Andrew – he’s going to be in Parliament and if he’s in Government he is going to be on the front bench! What we have here is an opportunity – you are a bright looking bunch and strategic thinkers. You can vote for the local candidate Ian Cummings as an independent and your National party vote. Andrew will be so busy with his portfolios – that I will be able to concentrate on the local issues. I will work with Andrew but I want to be busy in this electorates. Two votes – one party – and it’s not the Greens! Parliament’s House of Representatives is a loss. We now have a house of parties. When you are in a party in the House the Whip is in charge. If the Whip says you will vote for this, you have to do it unless it is a conscience vote. Some of us can remember back to Muldoon days when Derek Quigley crossed the floor, that ended his career. I followed Derek Quigley as a Young National which became Act.  I started with Labour as my dad was a watersider, a unionist. If someone had asked me to join the Communist party as a 20-year-old, I would have. I experienced Marsden Point as a tradie, and I was horrified at what I saw. So, my experience was what changed me. I learnt how ugly the unions were. So, I joined the Young Nats and my father was horrified. He was a socialist and socialists were going to fix the world. I wouldn’t go there. With your electorate vote, vote Independent MP Ian Cummings and put the local MP in the driver’s seat not the back seat. If you think an independent MP makes a difference – YES! Back in 1993 a fellow by the name of Winston Peters joined Parliament as an independent. One person can make a huge difference!
 
Andrew Bayly – National
I love coming to Clarks Beach. I do come here regularly. I am disappointed I missed the opening of the Bowling Club this year – obviously due to Covid. They normally give me the red ball even though I ask for the blue ball! Firstly, I would like to thank you. I really enjoy being a local MP and I never wanted to be a List MP. The reason why I like to be an electorate MP is that it gives you the opportunity to get to know communities. I like to build an association with communities. I deeply appreciate the opportunity I have been given in the last six years. The other reason I want to be an electorate MP is in a big party like National we have a lot of electorate MPs, but we also have a lot of list MPs. The advantage of being an electorate MP is that when we sit in caucus – everyone knows I have a very large majority – it means that I can be absolutely courageous and fierce in caucus. It gives me the opportunity to push. But you don’t see that. If I’m a List MP I am beholden to the leader and I never ever want to be in that situation. You want a local MP that can fight hard.
A couple of things that we have announced we are going to do is the electrification of light rail to Pokeno. The other thing that we pushed for and that Judith Collins and I did, and I wrote the paper, we have announced that we are going back to our original plan for Mill Road to make a four lane motorway from Manukau all the way to Ramarama. Unfortunately, in the last four years it got given back to Auckland Council. They had this bright idea of doing four lanes [on SH1] down to Papakura, then going down to two lanes and having a bike lane beside it, then going back into four lanes. Judith and I had a meeting with NZTA late last year. It has absolutely ruined a good plan. Those are the type of issues you can do inside a party. Our $31 million infrastructure plan- that’s what I’ve secured for this electorate. Those are the two greatest things. Obviously, we have all the other local issues. The one I feel most sorry about is not being able to get a ferry service for this area. That was my aim when I first came into politics. I worked with Sealink in Maraetai – we actually brought a boat out for sea trials. We looked at a hovercraft in Australia. But unfortunately, the two other people I was working with died so at that point I thought I didn’t want to go any further. At that point I handed it over to Council and at that point it stopped. But hopefully Jim Jackson who is here tonight is going to reactivate it. My mantra is we should live locally, work locally, and enjoy and play locally.  I want to make sure we get the health services we deserve; I want to make sure we have the infrastructure we deserve, support our forest, farming, and equine industries. That’s what I strive for. I am lucky I have quite a few portfolios but being an electorate MP is what I am passionate about.
 
Steven Svenn – New Conservative
As a third generation Franklin boy and I have been 26 years in business in this area. I have taken on this job because I firmly believe in democracy for all. No overseas organisation should be dictating what happens in our country. Democracy – we all get an equal say in how this country is run. Responsibility – we should all be responsible firstly for ourselves, then for our family, our community, and our nation. One rule for all – right now we have a generation that is coming out of school who hate themselves for being white because they have been trained to think that certain groups of people deserve special treatment. We want all people of NZ to be treated equal under the law of the land. This trend flies in the face of victim mentality has seen a rise in traction in our nation. Basic human rights – the right to life, liberty, freedom of movement and expression in whatever form that takes. Obviously, freedom of speech. Also, the right to sell, hold, disseminate private property. After all these are the rights that our forefathers fought for, died for, and defended. Let’s make no mistake about that threat today. Socialism is once again rearing its head and both the major parties are making partnerships and taking steps down this dangerous global track. Standing alongside me tonight are candidates from some of these parties and have signed off on one of the most brutal abortion laws of our time. Did you know that abortion is now legalised up to full term? In addition, with this current government we are experiencing the greatest financial meltdown since the Great Depression, which we are all yet to see the full effect of across the country. Fiscal management has been thrown out the window by reckless financial stimulus, followed by easy measures. We have seen the Emissions Trading Scheme passed into law and most recently the Clean Water Bill. Now there are measures being forced upon farmers around casual pugging of hills that make winter grazing impossible on some farms. Increasingly from my perspective, it looks like more and more I won’t be able to live and conduct my life without a bureaucrat’s say so. It’s kind of like the tail wagging the dog. New Conservative will do everything we can for the primary producers, farmers, growers, and the manufacturing sector by repealing the ETS, withdrawing from the Paris Accord. We will also be reviewing our building standards and introduce new rules around quicker process. How to get new products certified. We will also introduce a simple concept of emissions solutions that supervise rather than penalise and review the RMA, stop foreign land purchases, and pull out of this symbolic migration act.  We will scrap all bad gun laws and review and replace 1080 with a safe alternative and remove tax on tax to stimulate the economy. Further than that we will introduce the first $20k tax free for every person. We will also allow income splitting for households. Vote for New Conservative as your party vote and think very carefully about your electorate vote.
 
Lucie Rutherfurd – Outdoors
Third generation of farming people on the Awhitu. I have always been passionate about the environment. I didn’t like how we were treating our waterways. I didn’t agree with a lot of Council rules around what you are allowed to do.  So, I put my hand up and was fortunately elected to Council as a Community Board member for 4.5 years, had a by-election and then another 4.5 years. During that time, I sat and obtained my Commissioner certification and went on to do some really good things in the community on an environmental level. I have had 9-10 years now with Ngati Tama Aho as Resource Management Officer. In that role I have worked with Government departments, regional council, and local council, NZTA, transport, and have had a hand in parts of the Unitary Plan to get things on track. Your development down the road – my input to a degree is seeing that the stormwater is treated off the road. So, you’ve got your rain gardens and your vegetative swales. NZTA are now planting them down the motorways. That’s my passion. That’s why I’m standing for the Outdoors Party. They are really passionate about the environment from the grass roots – or the soil because it starts off in the soil. I believe that if the environment is not healthy then the people cannot be healthy. If your water’s polluted if your soil is unhealthy you are eating bad food. We are all suffering ill health and cancers and the likes. A lot of that is because we are not eating good wholesome nutritious foods. The Outdoors party is totally centred on the outdoors and localism and thriving communities. We are against the use of 1080 and that in itself will see a whole host of new jobs for people to get back into hunting and trapping and the food trade worth a fortune. We used to export possum meat. We are tb free in this country. We are centred on that. We are against the sale of our good farmland to overseas investors. Just recently a property in the South Island (that had 30 shearers twice a year) has been sold to overseas interests for pine trees. So you have lost your 30 shearers, your rouseabouts, the input into your local community and the worst thing of all is that those logs are being sent off overseas to  processed and then they are brought back just like our fish are. Then we tax. We need to bring our businesses back into NZ like NZ Steel – it’s the only steel manufacturer that does it all in this country and they produce such high-quality stuff. NZ makes enough food to feed about 40 million people. We could do more than that. With the Outdoors Party there will be subsidies, they want  to get rid of DOC and bring back the DSIR, bring back the Rural Bank, there will be loans for people  who want to get into family farming. There will be subsidies for farmers who want to turn into regenerative farming. There will be no taxes on incomes less than $40,000. We will also hold a moratorium on 5G to make sure it is actually safe.
 
 

Dave King – Act

Act’s policies are and what we are looking to do in the next parliament

1 Getting Kiwis back to work – that’s a major    2 Balancing the books – obviously, we are in a lot of debt.    3 Cutting red tape    4 Building for the future    5 Protecting public health – with Covid around it is something on everyone’s minds.

We think this election is going to come down to having a real roadmap to recovery. That will help us to rebuild the economy. People are hurting – jobs are gone, and we haven’t seen the worst of this yet. Having a forward plan is really what we are about. We need to work together to get out of this mess. Act has looked at how we can make it happen and how we can fund it. A lot of people are asking ‘where is the money coming from?’ We have looked at several policies, we are looking at an immediate reduction in gst for 12 months from 15 to 10 percent. That helps everybody and injects money into the economy. With that we have looked at the tax system and what we want to do is simplify it down to three levels. The medium level is what we want to clip the most – from 40k up to 70k. We want to cut that in half to 17.5 percent. From 70k up stays the same at 33 percent. From 0-40 we are looking at 10.5 percent. Part of how we fund it is by gst and tax cuts and the other half is from government spending. There is some really wasteful government spending going on at the moment. It is unbelievable what people are getting grants for and there is so much we can do to improve that. Part of what David’s idea is, is to look at cutting MPs salaries as well. He has done it himself by 20% and he says why not everybody. The Act party is not about the money or the prestige. We are not interested in ministerial positions. The word has been given to us ‘what we want you to do is sit on select committees, make good laws, be effective’ and that’s a lot easier to do when you are at that level, rather than higher up in government. We are grassroots people. We are working people like you guys. We’ve all got day jobs and we are going through the same things as you are at the moment. We have costed all this out and we have come up with an alternative budget available on our website. If you haven’t done the sums and you haven’t got the money you are going nowhere.

Ian Cummings – Independent

There are two votes – one for the party and one for the electorate or local candidate. I am asking for the local candidate. MMP was introduced in 1993 to replace First Past the Post. The idea of MMP was so that we have greater representation in Parliament and spread. A lot of votes went to National and Labour and there have been thousands of votes for other parties … and they all got pretty much wasted. The idea was to spread the representation. I won’t talk about the 5 percent threshold – that’s another story. What concerns me most as an independent candidate is that National and Labour and their spin-doctors want us to go two ticks. I think that is almost scurrilous. To me that’s so against the spirit of MMP. I can understand why they are doing it, but it is so wrong. Here in this electorate, Andrew [Bayly] has made his way up to 16 on the list and I congratulate him as that is no easy feat.  I got to No 9 on a particular party’s list and that took decades. It is not easy! To stay there is harder. Don’t feel sorry for Andrew – he’s going to be in Parliament and if he’s in Government he is going to be on the front bench! What we have here is an opportunity – you are a bright looking bunch and strategic thinkers. You can vote for the local candidate Ian Cummings as an independent and your National party vote. Andrew will be so busy with his portfolios – that I will be able to concentrate on the local issues. I will work with Andrew but I want to be busy in this electorates. Two votes – one party – and it’s not the Greens! Parliament’s House of Representatives is a loss. We now have a house of parties. When you are in a party in the House the Whip is in charge. If the Whip says you will vote for this, you have to do it unless it is a conscience vote. Some of us can remember back to Muldoon days when Derek Quigley crossed the floor, that ended his career. I followed Derek Quigley as a Young National which became Act.  I started with Labour as my dad was a watersider, a unionist. If someone had asked me to join the Communist party as a 20-year-old, I would have. I experienced Marsden Point as a tradie, and I was horrified at what I saw. So, my experience was what changed me. I learnt how ugly the unions were. So, I joined the Young Nats and my father was horrified. He was a socialist and socialists were going to fix the world. I wouldn’t go there. With your electorate vote, vote Independent MP Ian Cummings and put the local MP in the driver’s seat not the back seat. If you think an independent MP makes a difference – YES! Back in 1993 a fellow by the name of Winston Peters joined Parliament as an independent. One person can make a huge difference!

We think this election is going to come down to having a real roadmap to recovery. That will help us to rebuild the economy. People are hurting – jobs are gone, and we haven’t seen the worst of this yet. Having a forward plan is really what we are about. We need to work together to get out of this mess. Act has looked at how we can make it happen and how we can fund it. A lot of people are asking ‘where is the money coming from?’ We have looked at several policies, we are looking at an immediate reduction in gst for 12 months from 15 to 10 percent. That helps everybody and injects money into the economy. With that we have looked at the tax system and what we want to do is simplify it down to three levels. The medium level is what we want to clip the most – from 40k up to 70k. We want to cut that in half to 17.5 percent. From 70k up stays the same at 33 percent. From 0-40 we are looking at 10.5 percent. Part of how we fund it is by gst and tax cuts and the other half is from government spending. There is some really wasteful government spending going on at the moment. It is unbelievable what people are getting grants for and there is so much we can do to improve that. Part of what David’s idea is, is to look at cutting MPs salaries as well. He has done it himself by 20% and he says why not everybody. The Act party is not about the money or the prestige. We are not interested in ministerial positions. The word has been given to us ‘what we want you to do is sit on select committees, make good laws, be effective’ and that’s a lot easier to do when you are at that level, rather than higher up in government. We are grassroots people. We are working people like you guys. We’ve all got day jobs and we are going through the same things as you are at the moment. We have costed all this out and we have come up with an alternative budget available on our website. If you haven’t done the sums and you haven’t got the money you are going nowhere.

Mark Ball – Heartland

I’m a local. Born and bred in Patumahoe on a dairy farm, educated locally and joined the police – did 18 years locally. Catherine and I started our own business and in 2004. I was elected as the mayor of Franklin district which ended when we joined the Super City. Since then I have been involved in a couple of other ventures. Why Heartland NZ. We have been over several years, been getting more despondent across our electorate and our voice is not being heard. Our communities have been growing exponentially and with that we require the support of local and central government in order for us to have the infrastructure that is required, and other services. But it’s not happening. In 2008 I presented our district’s growth strategy. We knew where we were going to be parking everybody across our district, where we would be growing. I presented it to the government of the day in 2008 and was assured that because we had done it with consideration of our community, that electrification was coming – and still we wait. I was assured that SH22 given the growth, would be fixed up, double laned out to Drury – and still we wait. I was assured because we were on the corner of the golden triangle of Bay of Plenty, Waikato, and Auckland, that we would get a state highway started. SH1 was carried on. I was assured in 2008 that SH2 would be improved but we are still waiting. The answer to all of this has simply been to lower speed limits. We have always known that we would be requiring water for basics of life. The Super City arrived, and we now have water restrictions. So, it has dragged so many of us out of our little cocoons to say “ENOUGH.” We have had enough of the rhetoric of the promises of all of that from successive governments. Our economy of Port Waikato is the exact economy of NZ. We have sheep and beef, we have dairying, we have the underglass, we have kiwifruit, the equine cluster, we’ve got NZ Steel.  We have everything that the economy of NZ has but a whole lot of us are absolutely on the brink because of the stuff that gets thrown from politicians and bureaucrats in Wellington at 100 miles an hour! We also know that our economy will be the recovery of NZ post Covid. I love the fact that the parties are now coming out and getting another round of ‘I promise, I promise, I promise’. We haven’t got [electrification] to Puke but there’s a promise from one of the parties to take it to Pokeno. What Heartland is wanting to do is actually hold some people accountable. I, as many of you know, am about getting things done.  We have a rural fire service up here in Waiau Pa and the ratepayers pay for it. It is fundamentally wrong. The big red truck turns up and a ratepayer pays for it. They are underfunded, under resourced, under trained. Personally, I set about (with Internal Affairs) looking at the fundamental flaw in the process – the Fire Safety Act, and the Fire Services Act. We have now got an amalgamation of that – the Fire Emergency Services. So, our boys up here are now as equipped as Pitt Street. It’s absolutely fantastic. It is not about giving anyone a hospital pass – it’s about doing things pragmatically. It’s about doing what needs to be done. We have always been a nation of No 8 wire. There is absolutely nothing wrong with bringing all of that stuff back. Government doesn’t actually know best. It’s best done at a local level. I sit on several boards. One of them is Te Whare [Tapa Whã]. It’s about getting people off the breadline, off the unemployment and turning them into work ready people post Covid. We are about the people.

Jamie Macgregor – Advance NZ

I am a man of few words. I am a father and a stepfather. I have a desire to fix our future. Politics should be an alignment of values. It was apparent to me over a decade ago that our way of life was under attack. The progression now is staggering. Labour and National are both in bed with the Chinese communist party as we have seen from donation scandals. The Greens are no longer green – they are just another shade of red. At Advance NZ we stand for freedom, sovereignty, independence, transparency, and accountability. This is why we are seen as a threat to the establishment. Advance NZ started as a people’s movement and has become the fastest growing political party in this country’s history. Under the guise of Covid we have experienced firsthand our rights being taken away without consultation. In the first nine days of lockdown were deemed unlawful. We want freedom to reclaim our Kiwi way of life once again. That’s our right. Sovereignty – that’s our natural right to live life as one chooses without Government’s overreach into our lives. Independence – to have Aotearoa govern itself without interference. Transparency – to uncover what current and successive governments have signed us up for without our knowledge. Uncover conflicts of interest to govern openly by the people who put us in parliament. Accountability – we want to investigate and hold to account those that have not put the best interests of our country first and missed resources at the forefront of decision making. We want for Kiwis what no other government has offered. We want a fundamental shift in democracy – a mechanism to bring the people’s voices to parliament with recognised and frequent referendums. To recognise democratic principles and have our candidates sign legally binding intention and integrity charters as an additional layer of trust. Our firearms policy is coming out this week. We want to legalise firearms licences so that collectors can once again own collectible guns without persecution or undue prosecution. We will work to improve better standards and ethics of the law. We will create a national firearms committee to help implement government policy. We have just released our agriculture policy – we want to remove the Emissions Trading Scheme (EMS), the Paris Accord and other agreements that only stand to cost us for situations such as mono copying, excessive pine forestry. We will remove other red tape. We will customise how each region is handled with the input of locals. We will set up an independent people’s commission to investigate abuse against our people, land, and economy. 1090 use, fluoridation and vaccines will all be investigated outside of the corporate structures that benefit financially from their use. We will rewrite the Government constitution, write a people’s constitution, write a real bill of rights, for the benefit of all people in Aotearoa. We want sovereignty over our bodies, land. Flora and fauna. We will remove outside influences in governments such as foreign donations, the Chinese Communist party, the United Nations, World Health Organisation, UNESCO. We want to open the Government books and see where the money is coming from and is going to. What agreements are in place and do they really benefit NZers. Where poor, negligent, or malicious evidence has been shown we want to see heads roll – no more meaningless apologies. NZ is not for sale and our so-called democracy needs a massive overhaul. Why should the votes of 120 politicians count for any more than yours? That only results in people being overruled in a referendum such as the Auckland Super City debacle and the anti-smacking law. Return freedom to all Kiwis. Remove the Covid 19 Response bill which is basically a framework for turn. We want to end the ability to kick in your door if we suspect someone inside is infected. We want to take a risk based approached to Covid where we will protect the vulnerable if they choose and allow the rest of us to continue our lives and rebuild the economy. We want to put an end to the rolling lockdowns and the impossible strategy which is now being rejected by many experts and institutions. WHO and CDC have revised their numbers to the same range as a bad flu – and that is without a vaccine? However, the Labour Government still seems to be stuck on a flawed model. To kick start the economy, we want to forgive all student debt up to June 2021; we want to remove GST from non-processed foods, baby foods, feminine hygiene products, nappies, medicines and health supplements; we want dentistry for all covered by the healthcare system; we want to decriminalise cannabis; we want no income tax on the first $35,000 of income; we want to end foreign theft. No foreign nation should be able to ship away our most precious resources. We should be adding value here in NZ. We want to abolish Oranga Tamariki and establish a whanau-based approach, providing education and support to give families a hand up in life. Woven throughout our policies we will utilise an all-encompassing model for everyone. We are for empowering and uplifting everyone and treating the precious land we live on with respect.

Andrew Bayly – National

I love coming to Clarks Beach. I do come here regularly. I am disappointed I missed the opening of the Bowling Club this year – obviously due to Covid. They normally give me the red ball even though I ask for the blue ball! Firstly, I would like to thank you. I really enjoy being a local MP and I never wanted to be a List MP. The reason why I like to be an electorate MP is that it gives you the opportunity to get to know communities. I like to build an association with communities. I deeply appreciate the opportunity I have been given in the last six years. The other reason I want to be an electorate MP is in a big party like National we have a lot of electorate MPs, but we also have a lot of list MPs. The advantage of being an electorate MP is that when we sit in caucus – everyone knows I have a very large majority – it means that I can be absolutely courageous and fierce in caucus. It gives me the opportunity to push. But you don’t see that. If I’m a List MP I am beholden to the leader and I never ever want to be in that situation. You want a local MP that can fight hard.

A couple of things that we have announced we are going to do is the electrification of light rail to Pokeno. The other thing that we pushed for and that Judith Collins and I did, and I wrote the paper, we have announced that we are going back to our original plan for Mill Road to make a four lane motorway from Manukau all the way to Ramarama. Unfortunately, in the last four years it got given back to Auckland Council. They had this bright idea of doing four lanes [on SH1] down to Papakura, then going down to two lanes and having a bike lane beside it, then going back into four lanes. Judith and I had a meeting with NZTA late last year. It has absolutely ruined a good plan. Those are the type of issues you can do inside a party. Our $31 million infrastructure plan- that’s what I’ve secured for this electorate. Those are the two greatest things. Obviously, we have all the other local issues. The one I feel most sorry about is not being able to get a ferry service for this area. That was my aim when I first came into politics. I worked with Sealink in Maraetai – we actually brought a boat out for sea trials. We looked at a hovercraft in Australia. But unfortunately, the two other people I was working with died so at that point I thought I didn’t want to go any further. At that point I handed it over to Council and at that point it stopped. But hopefully Jim Jackson who is here tonight is going to reactivate it. My mantra is we should live locally, work locally, and enjoy and play locally.  I want to make sure we get the health services we deserve; I want to make sure we have the infrastructure we deserve, support our forest, farming, and equine industries. That’s what I strive for. I am lucky I have quite a few portfolios but being an electorate MP is what I am passionate about.

Steven Svenn – New Conservative

As a third generation Franklin boy and I have been 26 years in business in this area. I have taken on this job because I firmly believe in democracy for all. No overseas organisation should be dictating what happens in our country. Democracy – we all get an equal say in how this country is run. Responsibility – we should all be responsible firstly for ourselves, then for our family, our community, and our nation. One rule for all – right now we have a generation that is coming out of school who hate themselves for being white because they have been trained to think that certain groups of people deserve special treatment. We want all people of NZ to be treated equal under the law of the land. This trend flies in the face of victim mentality has seen a rise in traction in our nation. Basic human rights – the right to life, liberty, freedom of movement and expression in whatever form that takes. Obviously, freedom of speech. Also, the right to sell, hold, disseminate private property. After all these are the rights that our forefathers fought for, died for, and defended. Let’s make no mistake about that threat today. Socialism is once again rearing its head and both the major parties are making partnerships and taking steps down this dangerous global track. Standing alongside me tonight are candidates from some of these parties and have signed off on one of the most brutal abortion laws of our time. Did you know that abortion is now legalised up to full term? In addition, with this current government we are experiencing the greatest financial meltdown since the Great Depression, which we are all yet to see the full effect of across the country. Fiscal management has been thrown out the window by reckless financial stimulus, followed by easy measures. We have seen the Emissions Trading Scheme passed into law and most recently the Clean Water Bill. Now there are measures being forced upon farmers around casual pugging of hills that make winter grazing impossible on some farms. Increasingly from my perspective, it looks like more and more I won’t be able to live and conduct my life without a bureaucrat’s say so. It’s kind of like the tail wagging the dog. New Conservative will do everything we can for the primary producers, farmers, growers, and the manufacturing sector by repealing the ETS, withdrawing from the Paris Accord. We will also be reviewing our building standards and introduce new rules around quicker process. How to get new products certified. We will also introduce a simple concept of emissions solutions that supervise rather than penalise and review the RMA, stop foreign land purchases, and pull out of this symbolic migration act.  We will scrap all bad gun laws and review and replace 1080 with a safe alternative and remove tax on tax to stimulate the economy. Further than that we will introduce the first $20k tax free for every person. We will also allow income splitting for households. Vote for New Conservative as your party vote and think very carefully about your electorate vote.

Lucie Rutherfurd – Outdoors

Third generation of farming people on the Awhitu. I have always been passionate about the environment. I didn’t like how we were treating our waterways. I didn’t agree with a lot of Council rules around what you are allowed to do.  So, I put my hand up and was fortunately elected to Council as a Community Board member for 4.5 years, had a by-election and then another 4.5 years. During that time, I sat and obtained my Commissioner certification and went on to do some really good things in the community on an environmental level. I have had 9-10 years now with Ngati Tama Aho as Resource Management Officer. In that role I have worked with Government departments, regional council, and local council, NZTA, transport, and have had a hand in parts of the Unitary Plan to get things on track. Your development down the road – my input to a degree is seeing that the stormwater is treated off the road. So, you’ve got your rain gardens and your vegetative swales. NZTA are now planting them down the motorways. That’s my passion. That’s why I’m standing for the Outdoors Party. They are really passionate about the environment from the grass roots – or the soil because it starts off in the soil. I believe that if the environment is not healthy then the people cannot be healthy. If your water’s polluted if your soil is unhealthy you are eating bad food. We are all suffering ill health and cancers and the likes. A lot of that is because we are not eating good wholesome nutritious foods. The Outdoors party is totally centred on the outdoors and localism and thriving communities. We are against the use of 1080 and that in itself will see a whole host of new jobs for people to get back into hunting and trapping and the food trade worth a fortune. We used to export possum meat. We are tb free in this country. We are centred on that. We are against the sale of our good farmland to overseas investors. Just recently a property in the South Island (that had 30 shearers twice a year) has been sold to overseas interests for pine trees. So you have lost your 30 shearers, your rouseabouts, the input into your local community and the worst thing of all is that those logs are being sent off overseas to  processed and then they are brought back just like our fish are. Then we tax. We need to bring our businesses back into NZ like NZ Steel – it’s the only steel manufacturer that does it all in this country and they produce such high-quality stuff. NZ makes enough food to feed about 40 million people. We could do more than that. With the Outdoors Party there will be subsidies, they want  to get rid of DOC and bring back the DSIR, bring back the Rural Bank, there will be loans for people  who want to get into family farming. There will be subsidies for farmers who want to turn into regenerative farming. There will be no taxes on incomes less than $40,000. We will also hold a moratorium on 5G to make sure it is actually safe.

QUESTIONS:

Compared with the money allocated for upgrading the Kaipara Harbour ($100 million over 10 years) what are the various parties committed to doing to upgrade the Manukau Harbour?

The Outdoors and Advance NZ parties will stop using sprays that wash into the harbour, introduce riparian planting around the harbour. Andrew Bayly says big harbours such as the Manukau need a proper management plan. Mark Balle suggested Franklin District Council ‘absolutely tried the tourism route and extended rail’. He says the ARC has been cumbersome in trying to get the harbour used. This has been Mark’s passion since 2006. Steven Svenn would like to see the sediment build-up dealt with. A ferry would be a great asset, but it would require dredging of a channel. Ian Cummings would like to see a team of four working locally to look at the real problem and its consequences.

On Cannabis legalisation – Dave King said it is a conscience vote and it shouldn’t become a source of revenue for the government. Ian Cummings suggested that there is no time to ‘suck on weed’. There are so many other things to be concerned about. Steven Svenn is a definite no. Mark Balle, as an ex policeman would never legalise marijuana but as a party, they would consider decriminalising it, due to it impeding their future i.e. – join the navy or travel overseas. It is so hypocritical that the Government has said we will be smoke free by 2025 and now they are saying ‘let’s smoke dope!’ Andrew Bayly not aware of any MP against the use of medicinal cannabis but in terms of legalisation for personal use both his party and personal position against it. Advance NZ believes in decriminalisation but not legalisation as does the Outdoors Party.

What should be done about the Resource Management Act.

The candidates were all in favour of either scrapping or revamping the Resource Management Act (RMA). Andrew Bayly spoke about trade partnerships: $30 million [of exports] goes to China. NZ had the most favoured trade agreement with China. Then we lost the advantage and Australia now has one. We had an element in the trade agreement with China that we would be able to renegotiate the most favoured nation status. That hasn’t occurred yet. I’m particularly critical of the Labour Government over the last four years, simply because Winston Peters and David Parker have not been in a plane enough to get overseas. We have missed out in China. Notwithstanding that China is a very important market. My personal view is that we are way overweight with China. We have not enough diversification. Where this Labour government has been absolutely shocking is what they have done with the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA); we have missed out on America, Japan and all the foreign nationals came into it. So, it’s an important agreement. Japan is the hardest market to negotiate. We meant to be getting a good agreement with the UK. We sent our top trade negotiators to help them do the Brexit exit. With a view that we would be one of the first countries off the mark with Britain, we now find ourselves that we are not top of the pops. We have three or four countries in front of us and we are now being offered an agreement which is not what you would call ‘most favoured nation’ status. The last piece of serious deficiency is that Parker and Peters have been slow to deal with the EU. With all their agricultural subsidies is a very difficult market to tap. Parker should have been there every day. Murray McCully (our overseas trade minister) was probably here only 50 days a year. The rest of the time he was overseas. We are missing out on the EU. We won’t get America now, we have got Japan, which was started under us, we have England. The EU is highly unlikely. The real opportunity for NZ is in SE Asia. All those countries around the base of us – those countries like NZ. That is where we should have been investing our time for the last 3 years.  That’s where we should have been focusing on for the last 3 years and is the biggest deficiency for Peters and Parker.

Jamie Macgregor said we can’t just stop trade with China, but we do need to regulate it and offset tariffs against carbon credits. Mark Balle said it was all about balance. What we don’t want is an over keenness or over balance into one particular location. We also don’t want them coming down here and dumping product because they are coming here with a ship to pick up theirs. We need to look at it much more holistically than we have in the past.

Mark Balle: It was the only piece of empowering legislation that has been introduced into NZ. The RMA says you can do something if you mitigate the adverse effects. It has been hijacked by planners, bureaucrats in councils and unfairly dealt to across the country. We would separate the building side with the resource side. It would be replaced with two equally and better pieces of legislation. Steven Svenn agrees- his party would pull it apart, slim it down and basically simplify it. Ian Cummings would see it reviewed. You can’t just have nothing. We could go back to what we had before it – the Town and Country Planning Act. Dave King agrees with all – if you take it away you have to replace it with something that works for everyone. There are too many extremes of how it works. It’s broken. Andrew Bayly says National was the first to come out with a policy and everyone has coat tailed it except for the Greens.  It needs a ceremonial axe put through it. Act would like to see a quick process to circumvent major projects. Advance NZ would take it to the people and get local advice. Lucie Rutherfurd agrees that the RMA has been hijacked and that it needs to be weighed up and thought out. The reason the environment is stuffed is because of all the development that has gone on. We are already suffering from not enough good infrastructure.

What would each candidate like to say they had achieved at the end of the next three years?

Lucie Rutherfurd will represent the people honestly, without backhanders, and will speak her mind. She has already achieved a lot.

Jamie Macgregor – will focus on social services. He’s been through WINZ and ACC and they were absolutely shocking.

Andrew Bayly – if we are in power, I want to make sure we deliver electrification to Pokeno. We have to protect our local businesses, and especially the survival of NZ Steel in this electorate.

Mark Balle – would never have voted for zero carbon for NZ Steel which leads them down a drain that is very difficult to get out of. We have seen 270 jobs lost. We have seen fantastic farmland turned into pine forests to get carbon credits. Heartland would be representing the quiet, hardworking people. We would like to be remembered as having got a whole lot of things done and stopped others happening.

Steven Svenn – NZ Steel is a major concern and obviously the EMS is doing damage to that. There are a number of other businesses in that category as well. I want to support farmers and bring back the DSIR.

Ian Cummings – would like another term at the end of three years. NZ would know that this electorate has a representative in parliament who believes that our lives are not in the hands of someone else. Look after lives and property.

Dave King – the party sees its job as holding other parties to accountability. With more representatives in parliament the party will be able to hold other MPs to be accountable.

Andrew Bayly – The Zero Carbon Bill was supported by National and set up by an independent commission that said 15-20-year projections with strategies to pursue to reduce our emissions over time. It is independent, non-political and it takes it out of politician’s hands. We did not support was the ETS which is the nasty bit that everyone talks about. We opposed that. Farmers have been put into a situation where they will have to meet commitments that not even National would have committed to.  The most damaging thing about NZ Steel is the free allocations that the Greens want to take away from them. They are paying $3 million a year for the emissions, and it will get worse. The worst thing that they have done is uncap the emissions so that it’s gone from $20-$35 now and it will keep going. That’s what will kill NZ.

Should there be a three or four year term in government?

Everyone went for three years except for National who would like to see a four-year term.

The changes we have seen in the last 30 years mean that Port Waikato is becoming like a housing estate. Where do you see Port Waikato in another 30 years?

Act says the Building Act is on their radar. Ian Cummings says property rights through local government planning need to be looked at. The minimum wage is too high. Remove tax on $20 per hour wages instead.

Steven Svenn says property prices are being pushed up, governed by overseas policies. Central government policy is also influencing local planners.

Mark Balle – the community had a say in what they wanted for this land. There were 35-year rings around the towns and traditional land use was changed to other land uses. But all of that has gone.

Andrew Bayly – this is really a local council question as land use is set by local body law. ‘There are 500 planners in Auckland and most of them don’t even know where Clarks Beach is.’

Jamie Macgregor – would like to restore the Kiwi way of life and set sustainable development goals.

Lucie Rutherfurd – once upon a time 100-acre farms were enough to make a living. Farming has gone from regenerative organic farming to corporate farming. It is a Council problem not a central government one.

Dave King – reducing tax and GST to help restore profitability. ‘We can’t keep printing money.’

Can we trust the National party after their $4 billion blunder?

Andrew Bayly explained that the budget is complicated – about 200 pages. Treasury changed some categories and figures prior to preview, and we didn’t pick it up. $4 billion over 15 years sounds a lot – we take in $80 billion in tax every year. I’m not trying to trivialise it, but it was a mistake that happened. The reality is we rushed it.